Does humanity have a future?

I have a friend who’s a college science teacher and has written a couple of science books. She is constantly talking about how humanity is not the last word in evolution, and is bound, in due course, to go extinct.

It’s a pretty common viewpoint. During the Cold War we were supposedly doomed to “blow ourselves up.” And if not the atom bomb, there was the “population bomb.” Today the trope is that we’re making the planet uninhabitable. Or that technology will somehow bite us in the behind, maybe with a new race of super-intelligent robots that will dispense with us.

Common to all these themes is the idea of humanity as sinful in some way, bringing about our own destruction – and deserving it. People who spout these ideas basically just hate their own species.

I don’t share this misanthropic pessimism. I reject it completely.

It’s true that every other species that ever evolved has gone extinct (barring possibly some bacteria, and of course all those living today). Every species is an adaptation to a particular environment, maybe very successful, but the environment always changes. Perhaps your prime food source goes extinct – or a new predator makes you its prime food source. Whatever – change comes, and you go.

Humanity is different, though, in a crucial fundamental way, because we can change our adaptation. In fact we’ve done so repeatedly. Remember, we evolved in the hot African savannah. Then we moved out to Europe and hit – guess what – the Ice Age! Bit of a shock, yet we managed to change our adaptation and cope.

There is actually good evidence that what drove humanity to evolve into such a uniquely adaptable creature in the first place was that climatic conditions within our original African homeland went through a time of great changeability, going from wet and lush to dry and spare, and back again, and again, relatively quickly. That would have been hell on any animal’s adaptation. It caused the evolution of creatures whose main characteristic was their ability to change their way of life pretty radically when circumstances required.

The emergence of agriculture 10,000 years ago was a key example. Necessity was the mother of that invention; we had reached the limits of our age-old hunter-gatherer lifestyle, and to survive required radical change. And look at us today: our urbanized, industrialized way of life is once again dramatically different from what it was not so long ago. Yet again we changed our adaptation.

So please don’t tell me we won’t be able to cope with climate change, or any of the other bugbears du jour. We are not going extinct. Even if you assume – quite heroically – that the most extreme climate fearmongers, the most extreme sustainability fearmongers, the most extreme technology fearmongers, and all their kith and kin, all are right – and humanity will be almost wiped out – surely there will be some survivors. And surely they will figure out a new way of life for their new and different environment. They’ll repopulate the Earth.

So billions of years from now, the planet will still be ruled by people. Oh, they may be a very different sort from you and me – just as we are so different from cavemen – perhaps those computerized robotized bionic creatures of sci-fi – or something beyond, which we can’t even imagine. But they’ll be the “humans” of their time.

In five billion years, the Sun will explode. Now, admittedly, that will present humanity with a darn tough challenge.

But I bet we’ll meet it.

 

 

 

 

Advertisements

2 Responses to “Does humanity have a future?”

  1. David Kynaston Says:

    You speak like someone you has never suffered. Be Well.

  2. nyar Says:

    The monkey will not release the tasty nut in the trap, optimistically believing that he will eventually be able to free his fist holding the nut and run to the safety of the jungle. He will continue to believe this even as the hunter calmly walks toward him and slits his throat.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s